Aisi Taisi Democracy : biting diatribe on socio-political issues

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With an enthralled audience from across Kolkata, the maiden performance of MusiCom Red FM, India’s leading FM network’s newest IP witnessed a huge success at Nazrul Mancha. While the satirist humour of Varun Grover, Rahul Ram and Sanjay Rajoura left the audience in-splits, the gripping music of Indian Ocean transported them back in time. Rahul Ram shared his thoughts.

How do you see “Aisi Taisi Democracy” journey so far?

The whole journey has been simply amazing. We had no notion this becoming the way it has turned out to be. We thought of doing couple of shows just for fun! But the response we got inspired us to carry on. Our song Mere Samne Wali Sarhad went viral on all social media platforms. That gave us a lot of impetus. Personally for me the greatest thing was when college students started calling ATD to perform infront of them. Personally for me that was the kind of audience I wanted ATD to perform in front of. We were able to show them that one could think like this or possible to speak about these things.

 

Is there a greater appetite for political satire?

Definitely it is growing! Political satire has been around for years. We are nothing new.  Hasya Kavi  spoke about  hypocrisy of politicians. Now with the nation suddenly becoming polarized political satire becomes more important and people start paying maybe more attention to it.  It is also the evolution of standup comedy. Earlier it was just people performing in English. English speaking people for English speaking audience with limited thinking. Now it has gone beyond that. It is evolving in different directions. The fact that people like AIB or EIC doing interesting stuff. This to be encouraged. When there is more pressure there is more creativity.

 

In the last seven odd years, we’ve seen the rise of stand-up comedy in a way no one really anticipated. Why an increasing number of stand-up comedians are choosing to talk in Hindi?

I am sure. It’s how I feel about independent music scenario; earlier people with guitars were all English speaking. You have seen flowering of bangla bands here in Kolkata. The minute the language changes the content changes especially the lyrical content. Similarly the vernacularization of standup comedy has something that people of the upper middle class and middle class can see. Its translates into wider audience.

What are your thoughts on music as a tool for activism?

Music will not change people. But Music can help people to change. You can say things in songs in 4 lines that you cannot  say in a speech. Music has that unique power.

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